Debbie Rybka Howard NJ Realtor
Love WhereYou Live NJ

Community Information for
Maplewood NJ Real Estate

Maplewood prides itself on being a diverse and family-friendly community. In a number of surveys it is ranked among the most desirable places to live in the United States. The township has a downtown area alternatively known as "the village" with its own movie theater, several upscale and midscale restaurants, a small supermarket, independent café, clothing stores and more. Additional retail can be found on the newly re-energized Springfield Avenue with restaurants, coffee shops, kid focused stores and more.

Maplewood’s train station is located in the heart of downtown with service on the Midtown Direct to New York Penn Station. Should you not live within walking distance to the train station, Maplewood offers jitney service.

DEBBIE'S FEATURED PROPERTIES

Due to its close proximity to NYC, Maplewood attracts many theatrical residents. What Exit?, 1978 Arts Center , Burgdorff Cultural Center and Arts Maplewood are just three of the local options.

With seven public parks, the town encourages people to be outside and active. The recreation department supports programs for children of all ages throughout the year. In addition, the Maplewood town pool opens every summer in June. South Mountain Reservation is hosted by Maplewood and includes over 2000 acres. The reservation contains miles of hiking trails, picnic areas, a dog park and more.

Additional information can be found at:

South Orange Maplewood Public School www.somsd.k12.nj.us
Maplewood Town Website www.twp.maplewood.nj.us
Maplewood Online www.maplewoodonline.com
NJ Transit www.njtransit.com
Jitney Service www.maplewoodonline.com/jitney

History for
Maplewood New Jersey

When surveying the area now known as Maplewood, Robert Treat found several trails used by Leni-Lenapi tribes of Algonquin Native Americans, though there was only sparse pre-European settlement. These paths form the basis for what are the town’s main thoroughfares today.

The first European settlers arrived around 1675, primarily English, Dutch, and French Puritans who had earlier settled Hempstead, Long Island, and Stamford, Connecticut, via Newark and Elizabeth. They had acquired most of today’s Essex County from the Native Americans and followed three trails that roughly correspond to South Orange Avenue, Springfield Avenue, and Ridgewood Road from Connecticut and Long Island, New York. These three routes resulted in three separate communities that merged into Maplewood and South Orange.

Those who came from Newark on the trail that now corresponds to South Orange Avenue settled the area that became South Orange Village.

DOWNTOWN MAPLEWOOD

Six families (with last names of Smith, Brown, Pierson, Freeman, Ball, and Gildersleeve) came up today’s Ridgewood Road and established scattered farms around a center that became Jefferson Village, named after Thomas Jefferson. This village, which roughly corresponds to downtown Maplewood today, developed several mills and orchards. John Durand, the son of Hudson River school painter Asher Brown Durand (who was born in Maplewood in 1796), describes the place as a picturesque but slightly backwards community with close ties to Springfield. The apple harvest was apparently quite impressive and included “Harrison” and “Canfield” varieties. By 1815, there were approximately 30 families in the village. Although the residents of the area were predominantly Presbyterian, the first house of worship was a Baptist chapel in 1812. This was in use until 1846 and fell into disrepair until 1858, when it was taken into use as a Methodist Episcopal church.

Those who came up today’s Springfield Avenue settled on a hillcrest near today’s intersection between Tuscan and Springfield Avenue and established a hamlet known as North Farms. Over time, this community became known as the Hilton section. It became a stagecoach stop between Newark, Jersey City (then Paulus Hook), and Morristown and thereby a center for trade and light manufacturing. The village changed its name from North Farms to Middleville in 1830, and then to Hilton in 1880 when it was granted a post office. In 1855, Seth Boyden settled in what was then Middleville to retire but innovated a number of agricultural products, especially berries. Boyden also built and put into operation the first steam engines to service the railroad through Maplewood. The area became known for its orchards and related industries, including cider mills and distilleries of rum, but also honey and some livestock.

In 1802, Jefferson Village and North Farms were named as districts under the Township of Newark.

The three communities operated independently, each establishing their own school associations: South Orange established the Columbian school in 1814, which would form the basis for today’s Columbia High School; North Farms established the North Farms Association in 1817; and Jefferson Village the Jefferson Association in 1818. In 1867, when the State of New Jersey established public education through the School Law, the newly appointed County Superintendent merged the three associations into one school district, which was formalized in 1894 as the South Orange-Maplewood School District. James Ricalton, a teacher born in Waddington, New York of Scottish parents, set the high standard of education that persists in the school district to this day.

Maplewood was originally formed as South Orange Township, which was created on April 1, 1861, from portions of Clinton Township and what was then the Town of Orange. The name of the township was changed to Maplewood on November 7, 1922.

Theodore Roosevelt spent several summers in Maplewood visiting his uncle Cornelius V.S. Roosevelt’s home and property, known as The Hickories, covering 100 acres. This area is now partly covered by Roosevelt Road and Kermit Place. In the early 1900s, a tree bearing an inscription by Teddy Roosevelt was cut down from the front lawn of 36 Roosevelt Road.

When the Morris and Essex Railroad from Newark was extended to the area in 1838, a land speculator by the name of John Shedden built a railroad station in Jefferson Village and named it Maplewood. This name came to comprise areas known as Hilton, Jefferson Village, and areas previously part of Springfield. In 1868, farms were divided into parcels for residential housing. The 1920s saw significant growth in new residents and structures, foreshadowing a complete suburb.

Many of the most recognizable buildings and spaces were the work of famous architects and landscape designers. Most of the schools and the Municipal Building were the work of Guilbert & Betelle. The center of town is dominated by Memorial Park, a design of the Olmsted Brothers. The Olmsted firm was also responsible for the landscaping at the Ward Home, designed by John Russell Pope, and now known as Winchester Gardens, located on Elmwood Avenue. On the opposite side of town is another Olmsted work, South Mountain Reservation. The Maplewood Theater, where Cheryl Crawford first revived Porgy and Bess, was designed by William E. Lehman.

Maplewood was the home town of Agnes Sligh Turnbull, who wrote a series of novels in the middle 20th century. Maplewood was also the home of Harriet Stratemeyer Adams, the syndicate owner and one of the ghost writers of the Nancy Drew series. It is also the birthplace of the wooden golf tee, invented by William Lowell at the Maplewood Golf Club in 1921.

Ultimate Frisbee (now called simply "Ultimate") was invented in Maplewood in 1968 by students at Columbia High School. A plaque commemorating the birthplace of Ultimate Frisbee is located in the student parking lot.

It has been the site for several films, including Garden State, "Gracie", One True Thing, Stepmom, and The Reader.

There are approximately 226 streets covering 60 miles within Maplewood. One thoroughfare, Springfield Avenue, is a state highway (Route 124, from Irvington to Morristown), and four thoroughfares (Valley Street, Millburn Avenue, Irvington Avenue and Wyoming Avenue), are Essex County roads.

Demographic Information for
Maplewood New Jersey

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 23,868 people, 8,452 households, and 6,381 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,393.6/km² (6,207.1/mi²). There were 8,615 housing units at an average density of 864.0/km² (2,240.4/mi²). The racial makeup of the township was 58.78% White, 32.63% African American, 0.13% Native American, 2.86% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.56% from other races, and 4.01% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.23% of the population.

Estimated median house/condo value in 2005: $399,700 (it was $222,700 in 2000).[citation needed]

There were 8,452 households out of which 40.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.2% were married couples living together, 13.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.5% were non-families. 20.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.81 and the average family size was 3.27.

In the township the population was spread out with 28.0% under the age of 18, 5.6% from 18 to 24, 30.2% from 25 to 44, 24.0% from 45 to 64, and 12.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 90.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.1 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $79,637, and the median income for a family was $92,724. Males had a median income of $57,572 versus $41,899 for females. The per capita income for the township was $36,794. 4.4% of the population and 3.4% of families were below the poverty line. 4.9% of those under the and 6.0% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.

BAKER STREET IN MAPLEWOOD

 

Some of this text is available under the terms of
the GNU Free Documentation License at Wikipedia.
(See Wikipedia Copyrights for details.)

 

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage 545 Millburn Avenue, Short Hills, New Jersey, 07078
E-Mail: Debbie@LoveWhereYouLiveNJ.com   Cell 908.591.4886
Coldwell Banker New Jersey


Home | Meet Debbie | Listings | Buyers | Sellers | Communities | Contact Me | Privacy Policy | Disclaimer | Site Map
© Copyright Debbie Rybka-Howard & Northern Pride llc. All Rights Reserved. 
Visit the Webmaster - Northern Pride Design